Loblaws, one of Canada's leading grocery chains, recently announced its plan to revolutionize the food industry by selling only square-shaped fruits and vegetables.
Support independent media.
Loblaws, one of Canada's leading grocery chains, recently announced its plan to revolutionize the food industry by selling only square-shaped fruits and vegetables.

According to CEO Galen Weston, this decision was made in an effort to reduce food waste and make grocery shopping more efficient. He explains that round fruits and vegetables do not stack well in the produce aisle or in the fridge, but square produce solves this problem.

The company will begin converting their entire inventory of produce into cubes, using a highly-guarded and top-secret process. A Loblaw spokesperson said they couldn’t reveal too much about how it’s done, but it involves a lot of cutting, shaping, and possibly a little bit of child labour.

Embed from Getty Images

Customers have been quick to praise the move, with many taking to social media to express their excitement about slicing up perfectly square watermelons and putting them in their perfectly square Tupperware containers.

However, not everyone is convinced. Some critics have raised concerns about the impact this could have on farmers and potentially lead to a decrease in small-scale farming and an increase in factory farms. Additionally, the process of converting fruits and vegetables into square shapes may also lead to an increase in food waste, as some parts of the produce may not be usable during the conversion process.

We’re convinced that this is the future of food, and we won’t stop until every banana, apple, and carrot is perfectly square.

Loblaw CEO Galen Weston

But Loblaw Inc., Loblaw’s parent company, insists that they will work with small, independent farms to ensure a smooth transition to the redesigned fruit shape. Everything short of actual financial support was promised by the company.

Another potential problem with this plan is the impact on the environment. The process of converting round fruits and vegetables into square shapes may require a significant amount of energy and resources. This may lead to an increase in carbon emissions and other environmental impacts.

Embed from Getty Images

Controversies aside, Loblaw remains confident in their decision and is committed to bringing square produce to tables around the world. CEO Galen Weston stated, “We’re convinced that this is the future of food, and we won’t stop until every banana, apple, and carrot is perfectly square.”

While the company’s goal to reduce food waste and make grocery shopping more efficient is admirable, it will be crucial for Loblaws to work closely with farmers and other stakeholders to mitigate any negative impacts and ensure that this plan is truly sustainable in the long run.

Raysonho @ Open Grid Scheduler / Grid Engine, CC0, via Wikimedia Commons

Recent Posts

You might also like...